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Uruk Sulcus


Uruk Sulcus is a region on the surface of Ganymede with grooved terrain.

Image Uruk Sulcus Region
Ridges, grooves, craters and relatively smooth areas in the Uruk Sulcus region of Ganymede are shown in this high-resolution image captured by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft during its first flyby of Ganymede on June 27, 1996. This image was taken when Galileo was 7,448 kilometers (4.628 miles) away from Ganymede; north is to the top of the picture, and sunlight illuminates the surface from the lower left nearly overhead (77 degrees above the horizon). The area shown, at latitude 10 degrees north, longitude 168 degrees west, is about 55 by 35 kilometers (34 by 25 miles); the smallest features that can be discerned are 74 meters (243 feet). The line-like features are sunlit ridges, often arranged in parallel sets. The patterns of ridges and grooves indicate that extension (pulling apart) and shear (horizontal sliding) have both shaped the icy landscape.

Image Ridges and Troughs
A mosaic of four Galileo high-resolution images of the Uruk Sulcus region of Ganymede is shown within the context of an image of the region taken by Voyager 2 in 1979. The image shows details of parallel ridges and troughs that are the principal features in the brighter regions of Ganymede. The Galileo frames unveil the fine-scale topography of Ganymede’s ice-rich surface, permitting scientists to develop a detailed understanding of the processes that have shaped Ganymede. Resolution of the Galileo images is 74 meters (243 feet) per pixel, while resolution of the Voyager image is 1.3 kilometers (0.8 mile) per pixel. In this view, north is to the top, and the Sun illuminates the surface from the lower left nearly overhead. The area shown, at latitude 10 degrees north, longitude 168 degrees west, is about 120 by 110 kilometers (75 by 68 miles) in extent. The image was taken June 27 at a range of 7,448 kilometers (4,628 miles).

Image Mixture of Terrains in Uruk Sulcus
A mixture of terrains studded with a large impact crater is shown in this view of the Uruk Sulcus region of Ganymede taken by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft during its first flyby of the planet-sized moon on June 27, 1996. The image shows fine details of bright areas that make up about half of the surface of Ganymede. Pock-marked, ancient, heavily cratered terrain is seen at the top; it is cut by younger, line-like structures in the lower left of the image. The bright, circular feature in the lower middle is an impact crater with some dark ejecta superimposed on the linear ridges. These types of relationships revealed by Galileo allow scientists to work out the complex geologic history of Ganymede. In this view, north is to the top and the Sun illuminates the surface from the lower left nearly overhead. The area shown, at latitude 10 degrees north, longitude 168 degrees west, is about 55 by 35 kilometers (34 by 25 miles), and the smallest features that can be seen are 74 meters in size. The image was taken on June 27 at a range of 7,448 kilometers (4.628 miles).

Image Detail of Uruk Sulcus
View of a portion of the Uruk Sulcus region on Ganymede showing how the fine details of the grooved terrain that are the principal features in the brighter regions of this satellite relate to the global view of the moon. North is to the top of the inset picture and the Sun illumination is almost overhead. The global view is a Voyager picture taken in 1979.

Image Detail and context of Galileo Uruk Sulcus pictures
View of the region of Ganymede’s Uruk Sulcus placed on a lower resolution Voyager view taken 17 years earlier. North is to the top of the picture and the Sun illuminates the surface from almost overhead in the Galileo view. The finest details that can discerned in the Galileo picture are about 80 meters across. The four boxes outlined in white show the extent of Galileo’s initial look at this area.

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Page last modified on Thursday 23 of December, 2010 00:00:01 UTC by admin. (Version 0)